Reviewing 2017

As is now tradition, I wanted to review the last year and see what goals I was able to accomplish from my bucket list. Last year was another fantastic 365 days! I traveled to three different countries leading to whole new adventures and experiences

I am including only the highlights from this year in this post (for the full list just click the link above). I am also only showing one or two images of each species/location, if you want to see all the pictures from that subject just click that name and the link will take you to the appropriate gallery.

Visit and or Explore
Andes (2015, 2016, 2017)

Reviewing 2017

Mountain Lion (Puma concolor) in dry puna, Abra Granada, Andes, northwestern Argentina

Zambia

Lechwe (Kobus leche) females in floodplain at dawn, Busanga Plains, Kafue National Park, Zambia

Lechwe (Kobus leche) females in floodplain at dawn, Busanga Plains, Kafue National Park, Zambia

Every South American Country (Bolivia 2015, Argentina 2015, 2016, 2017, Chile 2017)

Mountain Lion (Puma concolor) female in front of mountains, Torres del Paine, Torres del Paine National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Mountain Lion (Puma concolor) female in front of mountains, Torres del Paine, Torres del Paine National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Photograph
African Cheetah

Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) twenty-one month old sub-adult female, Kafue National Park, Zambia

Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) twenty-one month old sub-adult female, Kafue National Park, Zambia

Geoffroy’s Cat

Geoffroy's Cat (Leopardus geoffroyi), habituated female, Ibera Provincial Reserve, Ibera Wetlands, Argentina

Geoffroy’s Cat (Leopardus geoffroyi), habituated female, Ibera Provincial Reserve, Ibera Wetlands, Argentina

African Lion

African Lion (Panthera leo) six year old male smelling air, Kafue National Park, Zambia

African Lion (Panthera leo) six year old male smelling air, Kafue National Park, Zambia

1000 bird species in the wild (I am at 294)

Wattled Crane (Grus carunculata) flying over floodplain, Busanga Plains, Kafue National Park, Zambia

Wattled Crane (Grus carunculata) flying over floodplain, Busanga Plains, Kafue National Park, Zambia

Lesser Rhea (Rhea pennata), Torres del Paine National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Lesser Rhea (Rhea pennata), Torres del Paine National Park, Patagonia, Chile

Black Skimmer (Rynchops niger) flock taking flight, Amelia Island, Florida

Black Skimmer (Rynchops niger) flock taking flight, Amelia Island, Florida

300 mammal species in the wild (I am at 151)

Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) sub-adults huddled together and sleeping, Ibera Provincial Reserve, Ibera Wetlands, Argentina

Capybara (Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris) sub-adults huddled together and sleeping, Ibera Provincial Reserve, Ibera Wetlands, Argentina

Marsh Deer (Blastocerus dichotomus) buck feeding on aquatic plants in marsh with Cattle Tyrant (Machetornis rixosa) on back, Ibera Provincial Reserve, Ibera Wetlands, Argentina

Marsh Deer (Blastocerus dichotomus) buck feeding on aquatic plants in marsh with Cattle Tyrant (Machetornis rixosa) on back, Ibera Provincial Reserve, Ibera Wetlands, Argentina

Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) three year old male feeding on male Puku (Kobus vardonii) kill, Kafue National Park, Zambia

Cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) three year old male feeding on male Puku (Kobus vardonii) kill, Kafue National Park, Zambia

Every endangered or threatened animal in California (7 out of 130)

Santa Catalina Island Fox (Urocyon littoralis catalinae) running, Santa Catalina Island, Channel Islands, California

Photographed this threatened Santa Catalina Island Fox (Urocyon littoralis catalinae) running, Santa Catalina Island, Channel Islands, California last year.

Another spectacular year, which always gives me enthusiasm for making next year even better!

How about you, anything particular that you photographed in 2017 that you are really happy/proud of?

*If you are interested in purchasing any of the pictures displayed in this post, please check out my fine prints page for pricing.*

Thank you for 2014!

In my profession it is often simply impossible to get the picture without the help of other people. To follow up on the Reviewing the 2014 Photographic Year post, I would like to thank those amazing people and organizations who made it possible for 2014 to be such an awesome year.

People

I first traveled to Uganda to try and photograph the African Golden Cat (this was my second try as this species was also my goal in Gabon last year). In Uganda I teamed up with David Mills who has been studying these elusive cats for the last four years. David and Laila Bhaa-el-din (from Gabon), are the experts on this species. For most information that is known about this felid, either of the two had a hand in attaining it. David is currently finishing up his PhD looking at thousands of camera trap images along with other data to determine the ecology about the Golden Cat in the eastern part of its range.

We were able to get two series of pictures of two different grey morphed African Golden Cats, all due to you, David. Thank you also David for your generosity, your willingness to help, not letting me be killed by that charging elephant, but most importantly your friendship! (Also for all of your help with setting up camera traps in Scotland!!!)

African Golden Cat (Profelis aurata aurata) researcher, David Mills, placing camera trap on tree, Kibale National Park, western Uganda

African Golden Cat (Profelis aurata aurata) researcher, David Mills, placing camera trap on tree, Kibale National Park, western Uganda

Alongside David, was Sam Isoke. Sam has been conducting wildlife research in Uganda for over two decades. He has also been assisting David since the start and knows as much as there is to know about the African Golden Cat. While I was there, Sam was even afflicted with a bout of Malaria. Unwavering, after a few days rest, he was right back in the jungle!

Thank you Sam for guiding me through the forest, helping me set up camera traps, your amazing cooking, and the great conversations.

African Golden Cat (Profelis aurata aurata) researcher, Sam Isoke, stepping between buttress roots in rainforest, Kibale National Park, western Uganda

African Golden Cat (Profelis aurata aurata) researcher, Sam Isoke, stepping between buttress roots in rainforest, Kibale National Park, western Uganda

I had the privilege of joining an anti-poaching team for two days as they looked for illegal activity in the forest. Both John Okwilo and Godfrey Nyesiga are extraordinary men as they head into the jungle every day, possibly risking their lives to protect the forest and the animals that live within it. During the two days I was with them, they found numerous examples of illegal logging activity and they removed both a neck and a foot snare, directly saving the lives of at least two animals.

Thank you John and Godfrey for allowing me to join you, but more importantly for the great conservation work you are doing in Kibale National Park!

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Anti-poaching snare removal team member, John Okwilo, Kibale National Park, western Uganda

Anti-poaching snare removal team member, Godfrey Nyesiga, Kibale National Park, western Uganda

Anti-poaching snare removal team member, Godfrey Nyesiga, Kibale National Park, western Uganda

A very heartfelt thank you also to Florence, who washed my extremely dirty clothes and ironed all of them to ensure that all potential Mango Fly eggs that may have been laid on them were killed. Thank you Florence for your smile, your help, and your beautiful fabric!

Florence, Kibale National Park, Uganda

Florence, Kibale National Park, Uganda

Francis, thank you for getting me and all of my gear safely in and out of the field. Thank you for your patience, your help, and your willingness to answer all of my questions!

Francis driving, Uganda

Francis driving, Uganda

Due to the help of Michelle Anne, I was able to go into a local classroom to photograph the educational outreach programs that David initiated and that Michelle manages and impliments. These lessons teach the children about the nearby forest, what animals live in them, and why those animals are important. It’s incredibly important information that most of these children would never otherwise receive. Thank you Michelle for your continued persistence to the cause and for sharing your work with me.

Michelle Anne in elementary school classroom, western Uganda

Michelle Anne in elementary school classroom, western Uganda

After Uganda came Scotland, where I was looking for the Scottish Wildcat. Kerry Kilshaw has been studying these small cats in the eastern part of the country for quite a while there. She finished her data collection last year and is now in the process of writing up her dissertation. She has helped the government on multiple occasions to answer the questions about Scotland’s largest carnivore. The Scottish Wildcat has a much better chance at survival with Kerry’s knowledge and research.

Thank you Kerry for all of your generous help as the Scottish Wild cat picture exists because of you, for helping with the organization, and for driving all the way to meet me, all while taking care of a toddler!

Scottish Wildcat (Felis silvestris grampia) biologist, Kerry Kilshaw, Scotland, United Kingdom

Scottish Wildcat (Felis silvestris grampia) biologist, Kerry Kilshaw, Scotland, United Kingdom

And finally, I would like to thank my fiance Kailani, because of her, we went abroad (since she was doing her PhD research), which meant that I was able to spend time in France, Spain, England, Wales, and Australia. Being with you is always the most fun and all the adventures we have together mean the most to me. Thank you for being so supportive and for caring so much about what I treasure. I love you.

Kailani photographing, Sierra de Andujar Natural Park, Sierra de Andujar, Sierra Morena, Andalusia, Spain

Kailani photographing, Sierra de Andujar Natural Park, Sierra de Andujar, Sierra Morena, Andalusia, Spain

Organizations

Like last year, I would like to thank (my gratitude is really beyond words) the cat conservation organization Panthera. Their continued efforts in saving wild cats is immediately apparent and it is a true honor to have had the privilege to work together last year (and as always, I very much look forward to working together in the new year!). Please keep doing what you are doing; cats and people all over the world are thankful for it. To the general public, please donate to them, if you are in any way interested in cat conservation. 100% of your donation will go directly into the field!Panthera_Logo_wider

 

WildCRU, an Oxford based research unit, who often partners with Panthera, conducts carnivore research all over the world. Many of the researchers I have worked with in the past, including last year are associated with them. WildCRU also allowed me to photograph their Badger work this last year, for which I am very grateful. Please check out their website for more information.

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Reviewing the 2014 Photographic Year

As is becoming tradition, I wanted to review the last year and see what goals I was able to accomplish from my bucket list. Last year was quite amazing as I traveled to six different countries to spend almost all of 2014 abroad. This provided many opportunities to have some very unique experiences.

I am including only the highlights from this year in this post (for the full list just click the link above). I am also only showing one or two images of each species/location, if you want to see all the pictures from that subject just click that name and the link will take you to the appropriate gallery.

Visit and or Explore
Tropical Rainforests (Adding to last years jungle adventures was a four week trip in June to Uganda)

Tropical rainforest in swamp, Bigodi Wetland Sanctuary, Magombe Swamp, western Uganda

Tropical rainforest in swamp, Bigodi Wetland Sanctuary, Magombe Swamp, western Uganda

Australia (2014)

Gum Tree (Eucalyptus sp) forest, Murramarang National Park, New South Wales, Australia

Gum Tree (Eucalyptus sp) forest, Murramarang National Park, New South Wales, Australia

Photograph

African Golden Cat (June 2014) – More on that later :)
Scottish Wildcat (September 2014) – More on that later :)

3 species of Civet (Completed this goal with getting a picture of an African Civet in June, 2014)

African Civet (Civettictis civetta) walking through rainforest at night, Kibale National Park, western Uganda

African Civet (Civettictis civetta) walking through rainforest at night, Kibale National Park, western Uganda

This year I added “All 3 Puffin Species” and I have one species of the three after photographing the Atlantic Puffins on Skomer Island:

Atlantic Puffin (Fratercula arctica) in breeding plumage, Skomer Island National Nature Reserve, Skomer Island, Pembrokeshire, Wales, United Kingdom

Atlantic Puffin (Fratercula arctica) in breeding plumage, Skomer Island National Nature Reserve, Skomer Island, Pembrokeshire, Wales, United Kingdom

1000 bird species in the wild (I am at 234, having added 44 species this year), just a few here:

Eurasian Coot (Fulica atra) carrying nesting material, Bay of Somme, Picardy, France

Eurasian Coot (Fulica atra) carrying nesting material, Bay of Somme, Picardy, France

Red Grouse (Lagopus scoticus) male, Scottish Highlands, Cairngorms National Park, Scotland, United Kingdom

Red Grouse (Lagopus scoticus) male, Scottish Highlands, Cairngorms National Park, Scotland, United Kingdom

Crowned Hornbill (Tockus alboterminatus) male, Kibale National Park, western Uganda

Crowned Hornbill (Tockus alboterminatus) male, Kibale National Park, western Uganda

Shoebill (Balaeniceps rex) landing with fish prey, Lake Albert, Toro-Semliki Wildlife Reserve, Western Rift Valley, Great Rift Valley, western Uganda

Shoebill (Balaeniceps rex) landing with fish prey, Lake Albert, Toro-Semliki Wildlife Reserve, Western Rift Valley, Great Rift Valley, western Uganda

Masked Lapwing (Vanellus miles), Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Masked Lapwing (Vanellus miles), Royal Botanic Gardens, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia

Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus), Jervis Bay, New South Wales, Australia

Rainbow Lorikeet (Trichoglossus haematodus), Jervis Bay, New South Wales, Australia

300 mammal species in the wild (I am at 107, having added 10 species this year), just a few here:

L'hoest's Guenon (Cercopithecus lhoesti) in tree, Bigodi Wetland Sanctuary, Magombe Swamp, western Uganda

L’hoest’s Guenon (Cercopithecus lhoesti) in tree, Bigodi Wetland Sanctuary, Magombe Swamp, western Uganda

Red-tail Monkey (Cercopithecus ascanius) in tree, Kibale National Park, western Uganda

Red-tail Monkey (Cercopithecus ascanius) in tree, Kibale National Park, western Uganda

Eastern Grey Kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) female chewing grass at sunrise, Mount Taylor Nature Reserve, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia

Eastern Grey Kangaroo (Macropus giganteus) female chewing grass at sunrise, Mount Taylor Nature Reserve, Canberra, Australian Capital Territory, Australia

20 critically endangered and 50 endangered species (I am at 6 and 22 respectively)

Eastern Red Colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus) mother and young, Kibale National Park, western Uganda

Eastern Red Colobus (Procolobus rufomitratus) mother and young, Kibale National Park, western Uganda (endangered species)

Another great year, which always gives me enthusiasm for making next year even better!

How about you, anything particular that you photographed in 2014 that you are really happy/proud of?

*If you are interested in purchasing any of the pictures displayed in this post, please check out my fine prints page for pricing.*

Thank you for 2013!

As a follow up post to the Reviewing the 2013 Photographic Year post, I’d like to dedicate this post to the people and organizations who made it possible for 2013 to be such a great year.

People

The first adventure was a six week trip to Borneo to photograph the wild cats found on the island. Enter Mr. Bornean Wildcats, Andrew Hearn, who has been studying these animals for seven years and is the leading expert on Sunda Clouded Leopards and the Borneo Bay Cat. He is currently conducting his field research for his PhD there, studying multiple aspects of the ecology of the felids including population size, density, habitat preference, habitat use,prey base, among many many others!

The Marbled Cat, Sunda Clouded Leopard, and Bay Cat picture are only possible because of him. Thank you Andy, I am honored to not only know you, but call you a friend.

Bornean Clouded Leopard (Neofelis diardi borneensis) researcher Andrew Hearn radio tracking in secondary lowland rainforest, Kinabatangan River, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia

Bornean Clouded Leopard (Neofelis diardi borneensis) researcher Andrew Hearn radio tracking in secondary lowland rainforest, Kinabatangan River, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia

The same goes for Gilmoore Bolongon, who used to be Andy’s field assistant and is now doing his own masters research on Sunda Clouded Leopards. Thank you Gil for always being willing to help, including carrying gear, arranging logistics, and determining camera trap locations!

Bornean Clouded Leopard (Neofelis diardi borneensis) researcher Gilmoore Bolongon, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia

Bornean Clouded Leopard (Neofelis diardi borneensis) researcher Gilmoore Bolongon, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia

Thank you to Nuh Engoh, Rizam Bakiri, and Hildey Baas for helping with carrying equipment, giving me rides, and just being nice guys!

Bornean Clouded Leopard (Neofelis diardi borneensis) researchers Nuh Engoh, Rizam Bakiri, and Hildey Baas making food at campsite, Tawau Hills Park, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia

Bornean Clouded Leopard (Neofelis diardi borneensis) researchers Nuh Engoh, Rizam Bakiri, and Hildey Baas making food at campsite, Tawau Hills Park, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia

Also a thank you to Roshan Guharajan who is a masters student at Michigan for being an extremely willing, patient, and generous boat driver and wildlife spotter!

Sun Bear (Helarctos malayanus) biologist Roshan Guharajan, Kinabatangan River, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia

Sun Bear (Helarctos malayanus) biologist Roshan Guharajan, Kinabatangan River, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia

And to Iago Bonnici for helping take down cameras from the jungle, just because he could. Thank you!

Iago Bonnici is the second guy from the left, ignore the rest of the crazy people.

Iago Bonnici is the second guy from the left, ignore the rest of the crazy people.

 

Next, came a four week trip to Lope National Park in Gabon where Laila Bahaa-el-din was concluding her PhD studies on African Golden Cats. She has been studying these animals for four years and too is the leading expert on the species. Her PhD will unearth many unknowns about this small felid including densities, habitat preference, diet, and their ecological relationship to the much larger African Leopards using the same areas. One of her PhD supervisors is Phillip Henschel who lives in Gabon and was nice enough to help me figure out where up and down is in the jungle. Not only does he feel truly at home in the tropical rainforests of central Africa, he is also an expert on African Leopards and conducting surveys for Lions across all of Africa. Both of them are amazing biologists,  know their way around the forest, and most importantly to me, are truly generous, nice, and caring people. The African Leopard pictures only exist because of them. Thank you two for everything, it was a true honor!

African Golden Cat (Profelis aurata aurata) biologist Laila Bahaa-el-din reviewing camera trap images on computer, Lope National Park, Gabon

African Golden Cat (Profelis aurata aurata) biologist Laila Bahaa-el-din reviewing camera trap images on computer, Lope National Park, Gabon

African Leopard (Panthera pardus pardus) biologist Phillip Henschel armed with camera, Lope National Park, Gabon

African Leopard (Panthera pardus pardus) biologist Phillip Henschel armed with camera, Lope National Park, Gabon

Additional thanks to Laila’s field assistant Arthur for being patient with pictures and making sure Elephants were not going to trample us in the forest:

African Golden Cat (Profelis aurata aurata) biologist Arthur Dibambo, Lope National Park, Gabon

African Golden Cat (Profelis aurata aurata) biologist Arthur Dibambo, Lope National Park, Gabon

Thank you to Ulrich Bogendre and the field assistants at Lope National Park who are extremely friendly people and know their way around the forest:

Botanist Ulrich Bogendre and field assistants looking at trees in lowland rainforest for carbon study, Lope National Park, Gabon

Botanist Ulrich Bogendre and field assistants looking at trees in lowland rainforest for carbon study, Lope National Park, Gabon

Théophile Desarmeaux for being an impromptu french translator and helping clean my camera trap gear. Thank you buddy!

Théophile Desarmeaux looking bada** at roadblock for illegal wildlife, Lope National Park, Gabon

Théophile Desarmeaux looking bada** at roadblock for illegal wildlife, Lope National Park, Gabon

And last, but not least, to Vianet Mihindou for helping with all the logistics at the ANPN field center. Thank you for making it such a smooth ride!

Vianet Mihindou, Lope National Park, Gabon

Vianet Mihindou, Lope National Park, Gabon

Organizations

I would like extend my deepest gratitude towards the world’s leading wild cat conservation organization, Panthera, which does absolutely tremendous field and conservation work world wide not only for the Big Cats, but also many of the small felids. Working with them has been a true dream come true and their goals are ones to which I am honored to make small contributions. Their staff is not only professional, but also extremely personable, and they have amazing attitudes towards making conservation change possible. Keep up doing what you are doing and I am looking forward to working with you again! If you have any interest in helping cat conservation, please donate to them. 100% of your donation will go directly into the field!

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Reviewing the 2013 Photographic Year

I always like to take a bit of time and review what happened the last year in terms of reaching some of my goals. For that I go and check my trusty Bucket List and see what things I was able to experience (or check off, for you twitchers). Turns out 2013 was a good photographic year.

I am including only the highlights from this year in this post (for the full list just click the link above). I am also only showing one or two images of each species/location, if you want to see all the pictures from that subject just click that name and the link will take you to the appropriate gallery.

Visit and or Explore
Tropical Rainforests (Borneo Spring 2013, Gabon 2013, Borneo Winter 2013)

Lowland rainforest shrouded in clouds at sunrise, Danum Valley Conservation Area, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia

Lowland rainforest shrouded in clouds at sunrise, Danum Valley Conservation Area, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia

Sunset over tropical rainforest, Lope National Park, Gabon

Sunset over tropical rainforest, Lope National Park, Gabon

New Zealand (August 2013)

Snow-covered mountains, South Island, New Zealand

Snow-covered mountains, South Island, New Zealand

Photograph
Bay Cat (December 2013) – More on that later 🙂
Sunda Clouded Leopard (March 2013)

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Sunda Clouded Leopard (Neofelis diardi) male in lowland rainforest at night, Tawau Hills Park, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia (camera trap)

Marbled Cat (March 2013)

Marbled Cat (Pardofelis marmorata marmorata) in lowland rainforest, Tawau Hills Park, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia

Marbled Cat (Pardofelis marmorata marmorata) in lowland rainforest, Tawau Hills Park, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia (camera trap)

African Leopard (October 2013)

African Leopard (Panthera pardus) male crossing log bridge over river in tropical rainforest, Lope National Park, Gabon

African Leopard (Panthera pardus) male crossing log bridge over river in tropical rainforest, Lope National Park, Gabon (camera trap)

3 species of Civet (Added Malay Civet and Common Palm Civet 2013)

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Malayan Civet (Viverra tangalunga) in lowland rainforest at night, Tawau Hills Park, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia (camera trap)

Common Palm Civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus) in tree at night, Danum Valley Conservation Area, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia

Common Palm Civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus) in tree at night, Danum Valley Conservation Area, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia

1000 bird species in the wild (I am at 190, having added 61 species this year), just a few here:

Buller's Albatross (Thalassarche bulleri) on water, Kaikoura, South Island, New Zealand

Buller’s Albatross (Thalassarche bulleri) on water, Kaikoura, South Island, New Zealand

Red-billed Gull (Larus scopulinus) during rain storm, Kaikoura, South Island, New Zealand

Red-billed Gull (Larus scopulinus) during rain storm, Kaikoura, South Island, New Zealand

New Zealand Kaka (Nestor meridionalis) parrot during rain storm, North Island, New Zealand

New Zealand Kaka (Nestor meridionalis) parrot during rain storm, North Island, New Zealand

Northern Giant Petrel (Macronectes halli) pair fighting, Kaikoura, South Island, New Zealand

Northern Giant Petrel (Macronectes halli) pair fighting, Kaikoura, South Island, New Zealand

300 mammal species in the wild (I am at 106, having added 45 species this year), just a few here:

Forest Buffalo (Syncerus caffer nanus) bull running, Lope National Park, Gabon

Forest Buffalo (Syncerus caffer nanus) bull running, Lope National Park, Gabon

White-nosed Guenon (Cercopithecus nictitans) in tree, Lope National Park, Gabon

White-nosed Guenon (Cercopithecus nictitans) in tree, Lope National Park, Gabon

African Brush-tailed Porcupine (Atherurus africanus) on log at night, Lope National Park, Gabon

African Brush-tailed Porcupine (Atherurus africanus) on log at night, Lope National Park, Gabon (camera trap)

Red River Hog (Potamochoerus porcus) male, Lope National Park, Gabon

Red River Hog (Potamochoerus porcus) male, Lope National Park, Gabon

Red Leaf Monkey (Presbytis rubicunda) in tree, Tawau Hills Park, Sabah, Borne

Red Leaf Monkey (Presbytis rubicunda) in tree, Tawau Hills Park, Sabah, Borne

20 critically endangered and 50 endangered species (I am at 6 and 17 respectively)

Borneo Pygmy Elephant (Elephas maximus borneensis) females and calf grazing, Kinabatangan River, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia

Borneo Pygmy Elephant (Elephas maximus borneensis) females and calf grazing, Kinabatangan River, Sabah, Borneo, Malaysia

Takahe (Porphyrio hochstetteri) grazing, Kapiti Island, North Island, New Zealand

Takahe (Porphyrio hochstetteri) grazing, Kapiti Island, North Island, New Zealand

I am looking forward to see what this year brings!

How about you, anything particular that you photographed in 2013 that you are really happy/proud of?

*If you are interested in purchasing any of the pictures displayed in this post, please check out my fine prints page for pricing.*